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Weight-Loss Surgery as a Counter Measure for Breast Cancer, Study finds

Weight-Loss Surgery as a Counter Measure for Breast Cancer, Study finds

Weight-Loss Surgery as a Counter Measure for Breast Cancer, Study finds

Weight-loss surgery may run counter to developing breast cancer:

New research presented by Cleveland Clinic Florida researchers stated that women with a genetic predisposition of developing breast cancer were likely to develop the malignancy 2.5 times more than the women who went on weight-loss bariatric surgery. Body Mass Index is the primary metric used to find the obesity level of the people. BMI level of 24 is said to be healthy, and more than 35 is said to be obese. 

The study revealed that those whose BMI is more than 35 are prone to develop breast cancer. 18% of the people with BMI more than 35 are in the cancer list compared to 7% of the people who have undergone bariatric surgery.

American Cancer Society revealed that those who have more fat tissue are in the hit list of getting Breast cancer due to rising Estrogen levels. Not only breast cancer, but overweight is also associated with more than 13 types of cancers and is comprised of 40% in the cancer list, according to the U.S Center for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Cancer Prevention is the new chapter as serendipity in our bariatric surgery study. The data is compelling. Further research is required on the same, and the weight loss surgery also proved to be decreasing the risk of cancer-associated disease by 40% for being obese and 33% of any cancer.

One of the economic challenges associated with this surgery is that most health insurers still follow the guidelines which were developed 30 years ago by the National Institute of Health, which recommended the weight loss procedure to those who have BMI > 40. But now so much of risk associated with BMI, to the figure of 35, and hence its time for the health insurers to revisit their requirements for surgical treatment and revise the guidelines going forward.

Weight-Loss Surgery as a Counter Measure for Breast Cancer, Study finds