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Scientists Find a Pathway to Treat Colorectal Cancer

Scientists Find a Pathway to Treat Colorectal Cancer

Scientists Find a Pathway to Treat Colorectal Cancer

Two recent studies find different preventions for colorectal cancer: Two recent studies published in Cancers journal and online by Gastroenterology finds new ways to prevent colorectal cancer. One is the novel way on how the Flavonoids naturally available in fruits avoid colorectal cancer.

The other is to target the microRNA that is the cause of colorectal cancer progression for PGE 2 signaling molecules that cause inflammation. With an estimate of 145,600 new colorectal cases being identified in 2019 and the origin of 51,020 deaths, these two findings will bring hope to thousands of people living with colorectal cancer.

Jayrama Gunaje Ph. D is the senior author of the study published in the Cancers journal. He is also an associate professor in the College of Pharmacy & Allied Health Professions at the South Dakota State University in Brookings. The other members of the study team are also working at the university. He says that colorectal cancer decreases by the degraded or broken down products rather than the parent compounds of flavonoids. He also says that these areas were underexplored.

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Flavonoids found naturally in vegetables and fruits also are the natural sources of salicylic acid derivative 2,4,6 THBA or 2,4,6-trihydroxy benzoic acid, which reduces colorectal cancer.

The other study published online by Gastroenterology was done by researchers from MUSC or Medical University of South Carolina. Raymond N DuBois MD Ph.D. and the Dean of the college at MUSC is the senior author of the study. He says that the study is one example of how microRNA could be targeted therapeutically in a subset of colorectal cancer patients. The researchers of the study found PGE2, a signaling molecule that is involved in the inflammation promotes colorectal cancer. It is by the microRNA, and hence targeting it could be the therapeutic potential that could hinder cancer progress. The MUSC researchers used mice to find this new way to target colorectal cancer.

Scientists Find a Pathway to Treat Colorectal Cancer